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Shoegaze Rock/ Psych-Pop Outfit Skyline Pigeons Celebrate Release of Their Debut Full-Length, ‘House of Mysteries’

Photo Courtesy of: Skyline Pigeons


On June 5, 2012, Santa Barbara/Los Angeles, California-based Roxanne and Caroline Teti, sisters of the shoegaze-rock/psych-pop band Skyline Pigeons, will be celebrating the release of their debut full-length album, House of Mysteries.

House of Mysteries is an 11-track collection inspired by the traumatic and liberating experience of loss and rebirth, following the Santa Barbara wide fires that claimed their home – and all of their possessions.

You’ve seen it on the news. Devastation over wild fires. Displaced families, priceless family heirlooms gone, and everything people once had now ashes. We watch this from the comfort of our homes on the news, feeling bad for the faceless people we see on our TV screens, but that feeling soon dissipates as the next horrific 5 o’clock news story comes on. However, what if it wasn’t just a news broadcast? What if it was your life? Your reality? And you lost everything?

Each song on House of Mysteries takes the listener inside the emotional journey of such a reality, the way one travels from room to room of a home. Skyline Pigeons are able to use each individual song to explore, uncover, and confront the hopes, scars, and fears that become buried in the human subconscious. While each song maintains independence, their essence is familiar yet fresh, the way a chapter of a book flows freely yet is bound by story—a story with songs intriguing and soul biting.

House of Mysteries was recorded at Bear Creek Studio in Seattle, Washington and was produced by Ryan Hadlock (Blonde Redhead, Ra Ra Riot, The Black Heart Procession, The Gossip) and mastered by Grammy award-winning engineer Gavin Lurssen (Ramblin’ Jack Elliot, Robert Plant and Alison Krauss, Cat Power, Lucinda Williams).

Rounding out the band with Andrew Harrison, Ben Potter, and Orly Gal, the outfit blends influences as far and wide as folk-roots, post-punk, and psychedelic-rock to create their dark, yet warming pop concoction. Much of their musical style is influenced by the era of the 50s, the garage rock era of the 60s, and the country rock era of 70s.

Concerning the process, Caroline commented, “I rediscovered a part of myself that was temporarily lost while we recorded this album. After our house burned down it paralyzed the positive energy and strength I once had. While I spent countless hours working hard on this album, I also spent a lot of time reflecting to myself in this barn (at Bear Creek) full of such unconditional love for music and I realized music is timeless. There are so many material items that can be lost; photographs and memories can turn to dust but the recordings of beautiful melodies will always be available to anyone as a reliable source of comfort—whenever they may need it.”

Roxanne added, “If anything, the fire as well as songwriting has brought me closer to embracing my true identity and working creatively as a musical team made me realize how important community is and the feeling that people are on this earth to help each other. I think our unity is something transcendent in the quality of the music.”

Throughout the record the musician sisters detail loss, sorrow, and heartbreak—relating to the fire—but also recalling other emotionally taxing or exciting times, such as a break-up with a loved one or the energized spark of new love, loneliness and isolation or the epiphany of sense of self and experiencing the rawness of fun.

The album’s eclectic layout carries a consistent but diverse sound through each of the songs and their various use of instrumentation. From the upbeat rock anthem of “Get Up” to the haunting and intriguing psychedelic trip into an apocalyptic scenario that is “Fire She Blows,” the record is as suspenseful as it is melodic. Expect to hear the haunting beauty of piano ballads such as “Lucid” and “Take Me Back,” as well as sexy, bluesy, garage rock songs like “The Cycle” and “Tennessee,” which emanate the carefree soul of California. In a mix of intense emotive tunes, hidden treasures of philosophical dreamscape like “High”, “Stardust Collector,” and “Alright” allow one to forget about reality for a while. “Unrequited” and “Together” invites one to experience or revisit romantic despair, and the sad yet freeing reality of breakup.

“What really makes this album so special is that every song is so different yet unified by our sound,” says Roxanne. “I feel like we have really defined what our sound is on this record—which is The Skyline Pigeons Sound.”

Sisters Roxanne and Caroline’s alto and soprano ranges come together to form a beautiful vocal instrument full of sultry splendor that captivates one with a relaxed seduction. Instrumentally the record showcases a diverse mixture of poignant piano composition, soulful organ, Wurlitzer keyboard, vintage analog synths, the relaxed yet tight percussive elements of tambourine and multiple bass drums, electric guitar solos, acoustic finger picking, dreamy 12 string strumming, and garage rock rhythm distortion.

The conclusion after one listens to House of Mysteries is that The Skyline Pigeons Sound is a unique entry to the music scene. They pour their hearts and souls into every note and give the listener every bit of emotion they have, both lyrically and musically. Now the sisters want to share the songs that have meant so much to them throughout these life – and mind -altering experiences to others. They’ll do that by hitting the road and performing in front of audiences whenever and wherever they can. For Skyline Pigeons, 2012 is the year of the House of Mysteries.

http://www.facebook.com/skylinepigeons

Listen to Skyline Pigeons’ – “Tennessee”

Source- In Music We Trust PR

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About CW Ross

I'm a Christian who likes writing about music and college softball.

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